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DRL : Established just three years ago, the Office of Security and Human Rights (SHR) is the newest office in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL).  Our mission, and our guiding principle, are in our name:  Security and Human Rights — not Security or Human Rights.  We stand for the proposition that better human rights practices, especially when implemented by security forces, enhance security for our partners — and for the United States itself.  We challenge the old model that places security and human rights at opposite poles.

Vetting Nations for Foreign Assistance Under Leahy Laws

We are best known for our function as the Department’s lead office for implementing the State and Defense Departments’ obligations under the Leahy laws, which prohibit U.S. security assistance to foreign security force units or individuals who have committed gross violations of human rights.  To do that, we vet all units and persons proposed for assistance.  And we are not a small operation – by the end of 2017, we vetted about 230,000 cases for foreign partners all over the world, including the world’s hotspots where we are assisting partners in fighting terrorists, insurgents, and transnational criminal organizations. Read more

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DRL : Established just three years ago, the Office of Security and Human Rights (SHR) is the newest office in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL).  Our mission, and our guiding principle, are in our name:  Security and Human Rights — not Security or Human Rights.  We stand for the proposition that better human rights practices, especially when implemented by security forces, enhance security for our partners — and for the United States itself.  We challenge the old model that places security and human rights at opposite poles.

Vetting Nations for Foreign Assistance Under Leahy Laws

We are best known for our function as the Department’s lead office for implementing the State and Defense Departments’ obligations under the Leahy laws, which prohibit U.S. security assistance to foreign security force units or individuals who have committed gross violations of human rights.  To do that, we vet all units and persons proposed for assistance.  And we are not a small operation – by the end of 2017, we vetted about 230,000 cases for foreign partners all over the world, including the world’s hotspots where we are assisting partners in fighting terrorists, insurgents, and transnational criminal organizations.