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Airman idea : The day comes when that final project is due for class. The project is ready and prepped for presentation or thrown together within twenty-four hours. Either way it has to be ready without delay. Despite being an academic project, sometimes there are cases where it could be implemented in real life.

Such is the case for Capt. Millie Hale, 22nd Air Refueling Wing executive officer, when an idea of hers that began as an academic project proved to have a great effect in her own life and for many dual-military spouses serving in the Air Force.

Hale, a student in Squadron Officer School, explained that her final research project involved a change that she would like to make in the Air Force. Her capstone presentation was on joint spouse retention and her simple idea made its way to Air Force headquarters.

“They read my proposal and they called me, asking if I could do a teleconference,” said Hale. “I ended up doing two teleconferences on it to explain my idea.”

In the National Defense Authorization Act in 2009, the Career Intermission Program was passed. This program allows the military to grant up to three years to members who desire to take a pause from the military and attend to personal or professional needs outside of the service such as going to school, raising a child, writing a book or whatever that individual’s dreams might be. It also allows the military member to take a leave of absence and return with the same rank as when they left. The Navy implemented the idea in 2009, and the Air Force adopted it in 2015.  Read more

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Air Force Joint Spouse Retention  : The day comes when that final project is due for class. The project is ready and prepped for presentation or thrown together within twenty-four hours. Either way it has to be ready without delay. Despite being an academic project, sometimes there are cases where it could be implemented in real life. 

Such is the case for Capt. Millie Hale, 22nd Air Refueling Wing executive officer, when an idea of hers that began as an academic project proved to have a great effect in her own life and for many dual-military spouses serving in the Air Force.

Hale, a student in Squadron Officer School, explained that her final research project involved a change that she would like to make in the Air Force. Her capstone presentation was on joint spouse retention and her simple idea made its way to Air Force headquarters.

“They read my proposal and they called me, asking if I could do a teleconference,” said Hale. “I ended up doing two teleconferences on it to explain my idea.”

In the National Defense Authorization Act in 2009, the Career Intermission Program was passed. This program allows the military to grant up to three years to members who desire to take a pause from the military and attend to personal or professional needs outside of the service such as going to school, raising a child, writing a book or whatever that individual’s dreams might be. It also allows the military member to take a leave of absence and return with the same rank as when they left. The Navy implemented the idea in 2009, and the Air Force adopted it in 2015.