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Olympic bobsled athlete wears two uniforms proudly: If, as William Shakespeare said, “Clothes make the man,” then Sgt. Nick Cunningham’s wardrobe reflects a man accomplished in two realms: the U.S. Army and the Winter Olympics.

Cunningham, 32, a member of the U.S. men’s two-man and four-man bobsled teams, joined the Army in 2011 and earned a spot in the World Class Athlete Program, which is operated by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command. The native of Monterey, California, is a construction masonry engineer in the Army.

“When I put on my uniform for the first time in basic training, I felt a sense of pride I had never imagined,” Cunningham said. “Having the word Army across my chest is something I definitely don’t take for granted.”

Speaking from Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where the U.S. bobsled team is practicing, Cunningham said they were “training smart so we can keep our continuity” two weeks before the opening ceremonies in PyeongChang, South Korea.

One of the more experienced athletes on the team, Cunningham is making his third trip to the Winter Games with hopes of medaling. He was a member of the 2010 and 2014 men’s bobsled teams at the Olympics and has been a member of the U.S. World Team four times.

Unlike many WCAP participants, Cunningham already was an Olympic athlete when he joined, after learning about the program from a teammate. Cunningham attended his first WCAP meeting with a healthy dose of skepticism.  Read more

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Olympic bobsled athlete wears two uniforms proudly: If, as William Shakespeare said, “Clothes make the man,” then Sgt. Nick Cunningham’s wardrobe reflects a man accomplished in two realms: the U.S. Army and the Winter Olympics.

Cunningham, 32, a member of the U.S. men’s two-man and four-man bobsled teams, joined the Army in 2011 and earned a spot in the World Class Athlete Program, which is operated by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command. The native of Monterey, California, is a construction masonry engineer in the Army.

“When I put on my uniform for the first time in basic training, I felt a sense of pride I had never imagined,” Cunningham said. “Having the word Army across my chest is something I definitely don’t take for granted.”

Speaking from Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where the U.S. bobsled team is practicing, Cunningham said they were “training smart so we can keep our continuity” two weeks before the opening ceremonies in PyeongChang, South Korea.