Select Page

Sale of Child Abusers Home Benefits Organization  :  A Kentucky home where two brothers abused dozens of children over more than two decades has been sold following its civil forfeiture, and the proceeds will benefit a local advocacy group that serves young abuse victims.

The unique arrangement emerged following the investigation of twins Jack and Jerry Cassidy, of Lexington, who pleaded guilty in 2015 to state charges of child pornography and sexual abuse of minors. The brothers were longtime Boy Scout leaders and trusted members of the community, and many of their criminal acts were committed in the house where they held their meetings. Because the property played a central role in the crimes—including facilitating the movement of minors across state lines—local investigators and prosecutors worked with the U.S. Attorney’s Office to seize the property under federal asset forfeiture laws. The effort set in motion a novel approach to supporting a program for young victims like those the Cassidy brothers abused from 1963 to 1986.

“It’s a good example of what can be done for the good of the community,” said Wade Napier, an assistant U.S. attorney who helped implement the civil forfeiture. Read more

Also Read: http://topintelligencereport.com/1st-stryker-brigade-4th-infantry/

Sale of Child Abusers Home Benefits Organization  :  A Kentucky home where two brothers abused dozens of children over more than two decades has been sold following its civil forfeiture, and the proceeds will benefit a local advocacy group that serves young abuse victims.

The unique arrangement emerged following the investigation of twins Jack and Jerry Cassidy, of Lexington, who pleaded guilty in 2015 to state charges of child pornography and sexual abuse of minors. The brothers were longtime Boy Scout leaders and trusted members of the community, and many of their criminal acts were committed in the house where they held their meetings. Because the property played a central role in the crimes—including facilitating the movement of minors across state lines—local investigators and prosecutors worked with the U.S. Attorney’s Office to seize the property under federal asset forfeiture laws. The effort set in motion a novel approach to supporting a program for young victims like those the Cassidy brothers abused from 1963 to 1986.