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Army engineers : Anti-access, area-denial, also known as A2AD, methods are used by enemy forces to slow or stop an invasion through such things as the placement of mines in the seabed near shore and concealment of forces inland.

New littoral and inland mapping tools are being developed by Army researchers to breach some of the A2AD threats. Experts spoke about these developments at the 2017 Annual Meeting and Exposition of the Association of the U.S. Army in October.

LITTORAL MAPPING

Soldiers and Marines will often travel from ship-to-shore in small landing craft.

Surf zones can be extremely dangerous places to navigate, with unseen sandbars that can ground vessels, large waves that can overturn them and strong currents that can affect navigation, according to Dr. Katherine Brodie, a research oceanographer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Engineer Research and Development Center. Read more

Read also: Citizen-Soldiers : the Soldier behind the rank (part 3)

Army engineers : Anti-access, area-denial, also known as A2AD, methods are used by enemy forces to slow or stop an invasion through such things as the placement of mines in the seabed near shore and concealment of forces inland.

New littoral and inland mapping tools are being developed by Army researchers to breach some of the A2AD threats. Experts spoke about these developments at the 2017 Annual Meeting and Exposition of the Association of the U.S. Army in October. 

LITTORAL MAPPING

Soldiers and Marines will often travel from ship-to-shore in small landing craft. 

Surf zones can be extremely dangerous places to navigate, with unseen sandbars that can ground vessels, large waves that can overturn them and strong currents that can affect navigation, according to Dr. Katherine Brodie, a research oceanographer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Engineer Research and Development Center.

Army engineers : Anti-access, area-denial, also known as A2AD, methods are used by enemy forces to slow or stop an invasion through such things as the placement of mines in the seabed near shore and concealment of forces inland.

New littoral and inland mapping tools are being developed by Army researchers to breach some of the A2AD threats. Experts spoke about these developments at the 2017 Annual Meeting and Exposition of the Association of the U.S. Army in October. 

LITTORAL MAPPING

Soldiers and Marines will often travel from ship-to-shore in small landing craft. 

Surf zones can be extremely dangerous places to navigate, with unseen sandbars that can ground vessels, large waves that can overturn them and strong currents that can affect navigation, according to Dr. Katherine Brodie, a research oceanographer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Engineer Research and Development Center.