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Tribal Communities : The U.S. Department of Justice today announced the opening of the grant solicitation period for comprehensive funding to federally-recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments and tribal consortia to support public safety, victim services and crime prevention.

The Department’s Fiscal Year 2018 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation, or “CTAS,” posts today athttps://www.justice.gov/tribal/open-solicitations. The solicitation contains details about available grants and describes how tribes, tribal consortia and Alaskan villages can apply for the funds.

The funding can be used to enhance law enforcement; bolster adult and juvenile justice systems; prevent and control juvenile delinquency; serve native victims of crimes such as child abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, and elder abuse; and support other efforts to combat crime.

“We’re proud to offer American Indian and Alaska Native communities opportunities to continue to improve public safety, better serve victims of crime, and strengthen criminal justice systems,” said Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand.  “CTAS projects support Native American women, ensure tribal self-determination, and further our shared goals of safe and secure communities for American Indian and Alaska Native peoples.” Read more

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Tribal Communities : The U.S. Department of Justice today announced the opening of the grant solicitation period for comprehensive funding to federally-recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments and tribal consortia to support public safety, victim services and crime prevention.

The Department’s Fiscal Year 2018 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation, or “CTAS,” posts today athttps://www.justice.gov/tribal/open-solicitations. The solicitation contains details about available grants and describes how tribes, tribal consortia and Alaskan villages can apply for the funds.

The funding can be used to enhance law enforcement; bolster adult and juvenile justice systems; prevent and control juvenile delinquency; serve native victims of crimes such as child abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, and elder abuse; and support other efforts to combat crime. 

“We’re proud to offer American Indian and Alaska Native communities opportunities to continue to improve public safety, better serve victims of crime, and strengthen criminal justice systems,” said Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand.  “CTAS projects support Native American women, ensure tribal self-determination, and further our shared goals of safe and secure communities for American Indian and Alaska Native peoples.”