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Innovation through agility: Building the Army’s Integrated Personnel and Pay System

 

In late November 1941, the U.S. Army’s 11th Cavalry — the Blackhorse Regiment — was ordered to travel through Southern California to Camp Lockett, a small outpost located about one mile from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their mission was to protect the San Diego and Arizona Railway from possible Japanese sabotage. Fears of an attack on the railway would ultimately prove to be unfounded as Japan focused on the Pacific Theater.

Nevertheless, the 11th Cavalry’s journey to Camp Lockett would make history. The horse mounted Blackhorse Regiment traveled nearly 90 miles through arid and rocky desert terrain in just under two days. It would be the Regiment’s last-ever mission executed as a horse mounted unit.

By June of 1942, America’s involvement in World War II placed new requirements on the Army and the U.S. military as a whole. It demanded the Army adopt a newer, more modern concept of war. As a consequence of this evolution, the 11th Cavalry was inactivated as a horse mounted unit, transferred to Fort Benning, Georgia, and reactivated as the 11th Armored Regiment. The Army had officially moved from riding horses to driving tanks.

Today’s Army finds itself with a similar dilemma: how to deliver warfighting capabilities in an environment increasingly defined by rapid technological advancements and the changing character of war. The United States currently faces a host of challenges from adversaries spanning the globe and we as a nation are “facing increased global disorder, characterized by decline in the long-standing rules-based international order.” The growing complexity of the global security environment provides the imperative for us to modernize. Read more

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Innovation through agility: Building the Army’s Integrated Personnel and Pay System

 

In late November 1941, the U.S. Army’s 11th Cavalry — the Blackhorse Regiment — was ordered to travel through Southern California to Camp Lockett, a small outpost located about one mile from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their mission was to protect the San Diego and Arizona Railway from possible Japanese sabotage. Fears of an attack on the railway would ultimately prove to be unfounded as Japan focused on the Pacific Theater.