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I Am Diplomacy, I Am America: My Journey From Intern to Recruiter: As a native Washingtonian, educated in the DC public school system, an African American woman, and a graduate of a Historically Black College and University (HBCU), I am honored to serve today as one of the U.S. Department of State’s HR Recruitment Outreach Specialists. In this capacity, I travel throughout the United States, sharing information about DOS opportunities at HBCUs, and targeted African American Professional Associations, including African American Fraternities and Sororities to identify and attract potential candidates to DOS careers and programs, and build a pipeline of diverse candidates for current and future careers. These interactions are exciting because I get to meet some of the best and brightest future leaders of this country. They are also nostalgic, because as I travel and meet young people around the country, I am reminded of my own journey to the Department.

I was raised by my grandparents who instilled in me the importance of education and public service. I learned about federal government in high school. One of my high school electives was “Preparing to Take the Civil Service Test,” and during my senior year, a career counselor recommended I apply for a “worker trainee” position, one of the student programs at the U.S. Department of State. This paid internship based on financial needs gave me an opportunity to gain federal government experience in high school and throughout college, while working during the summer, holidays, and breaks.

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I Am Diplomacy, I Am America: My Journey From Intern to Recruiter: As a native Washingtonian, educated in the DC public school system, an African American woman, and a graduate of a Historically Black College and University (HBCU), I am honored to serve today as one of the U.S. Department of State’s HR Recruitment Outreach Specialists. In this capacity, I travel throughout the United States, sharing information about DOS opportunities at HBCUs, and targeted African American Professional Associations, including African American Fraternities and Sororities to identify and attract potential candidates to DOS careers and programs, and build a pipeline of diverse candidates for current and future careers. These interactions are exciting because I get to meet some of the best and brightest future leaders of this country. They are also nostalgic, because as I travel and meet young people around the country, I am reminded of my own journey to the Department.I was raised by my grandparents who instilled in me the importance of education and public service. I learned about federal government in high school. One of my high school electives was “Preparing to Take the Civil Service Test,” and during my senior year, a career counselor recommended I apply for a “worker trainee” position, one of the student programs at the U.S. Department of State. This paid internship based on financial needs gave me an opportunity to gain federal government experience in high school and throughout college, while working during the summer, holidays, and breaks.