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Counterterrorism Diplomacy  : Throughout 2017, the Counterterrorism Bureau (CT) led the State Department’s diplomatic efforts to defeat ISIS, al-Qa’ida, Hizballah, and other global terrorist groups. We did this by strengthening bilateral and multilateral counterterrorism partnerships, building the capacity of frontline states, improving information sharing and border security to stanch the flow of foreign terrorist fighters returning from Syria and Iraq, opposing Iranian-supported terrorism, designating more terrorists and cutting off their funding, and countering terrorist ideology and recruitment. Here are ten highlights:

1. UNSCR 2396. On December 21, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 2396, which provides member states new tools to detect and counter foreign terrorist fighters and homegrown terrorists. The United States drafted and led the negotiation of the resolution, which requires all UN members to use Passenger Name Record data to stop terrorist travel. It further directs UN members to collect biometric data and develop watchlists of known and suspected terrorists. Resolution 2396 also calls for stricter aviation security standards and urges UN members to share counterterrorism information both internally and with each other. Read my Washington Post op-ed about UNSCR 2396.

2. North Korea. On November 20, the Secretary of State designated the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) as a State Sponsor of Terrorism. The designation was based on the Secretary’s determination that DPRK repeatedly has provided support to acts of international terrorism, and further isolates Pyongyang from the international community. Read more

Read also: Turkish Banker Convicted of Conspiring to Evade U.S. Sanctions Against Iran and Other Offenses

Counterterrorism Diplomacy  : Throughout 2017, the Counterterrorism Bureau (CT) led the State Department’s diplomatic efforts to defeat ISIS, al-Qa’ida, Hizballah, and other global terrorist groups. We did this by strengthening bilateral and multilateral counterterrorism partnerships, building the capacity of frontline states, improving information sharing and border security to stanch the flow of foreign terrorist fighters returning from Syria and Iraq, opposing Iranian-supported terrorism, designating more terrorists and cutting off their funding, and countering terrorist ideology and recruitment. Here are ten highlights: 

1. UNSCR 2396. On December 21, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 2396, which provides member states new tools to detect and counter foreign terrorist fighters and homegrown terrorists. The United States drafted and led the negotiation of the resolution, which requires all UN members to use Passenger Name Record data to stop terrorist travel. It further directs UN members to collect biometric data and develop watchlists of known and suspected terrorists. Resolution 2396 also calls for stricter aviation security standards and urges UN members to share counterterrorism information both internally and with each other. Read my Washington Post op-ed about UNSCR 2396.

2. North Korea. On November 20, the Secretary of State designated the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) as a State Sponsor of Terrorism. The designation was based on the Secretary’s determination that DPRK repeatedly has provided support to acts of international terrorism, and further isolates Pyongyang from the international community.