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U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command’s CID Computer Crime Investigative Unit (CCIU) is once again warning Soldiers and the Army community to be on the lookout for “social media scams” where cybercriminals impersonate service members by using actual and fictitious information, not just for “trust-based relationship scams,” also known as Romance Scams, but for other impersonation crimes such as sales schemes and advance fee schemes.

“By monitoring your social media identity, you can protect your Army family and your reputation,” said Special Agent Daniel Andrews, CCIU director. “The criminals will use factual data from official websites and Soldiers’ personal social media sites, then prey on vulnerable people’s trusting nature and willingness to help the Soldier.”

Frequently, CID receives notifications from individuals stating they were scammed online by someone claiming to be a Soldier, but in reality it was an online scammer who has used an unsuspected Soldier’s name and available social media photos to commit a crime.

No one is immune from becoming a victim. Scammers steal the identity of senior officers, enlisted personnel and civilians. Scammers, using this information from legitimate profiles, will capitalize on the trustworthy reputation of individuals associated with the Army.

According to experts, mitigating fraudulent social media is not simple and there is no definitive way to stop criminals from using your personal data and photos. CID officials say that the ideal solution is to limit the details you provide about yourself in your social media profile. Additionally, Soldiers should take of advantage of all security and safety features and protocols offered on their social media accounts. Read more

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U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command’s CID Computer Crime Investigative Unit (CCIU) is once again warning Soldiers and the Army community to be on the lookout for “social media scams” where cybercriminals impersonate service members by using actual and fictitious information, not just for “trust-based relationship scams,” also known as Romance Scams, but for other impersonation crimes such as sales schemes and advance fee schemes.

“By monitoring your social media identity, you can protect your Army family and your reputation,” said Special Agent Daniel Andrews, CCIU director. “The criminals will use factual data from official websites and Soldiers’ personal social media sites, then prey on vulnerable people’s trusting nature and willingness to help the Soldier.”