Select Page

Arming Citizen Scientists With an App to Identify Zika Carriers:Rusty Low’s keen interest in investigating habitats has taken her from archeology and paleoclimate research to where she is today: following the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika through the use of mobile technology.

“I’m interested in climate, how it’s changing, and how mosquitoes are responding to these changes by becoming an invasive species and expanding into new habitats. We developed an app where people can work as citizen scientists to identify breeding sites for mosquitoes potentially carrying the Zika virus, and become agents of change reducing the risk of Zika and other vector-borne diseases in their communities. They can report their findings, including habitat data, which end up on a shared map in the cloud,” says Low, a climate scientist at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES).

Mosquitoes are responsible for the transmission of a number of very serious pathogens, such as Zika, malaria, dengue, West Nile virus, and yellow fever. The impact of these infectious diseases are immense, killing millions of people and animals every year, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

Read More… 

Related News:Kentucky Guard shares medical expertise with Djibouti. Read More… 

Arming Citizen Scientists With an App to Identify Zika Carriers:Rusty Low’s keen interest in investigating habitats has taken her from archeology and paleoclimate research to where she is today: following the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika through the use of mobile technology.

“I’m interested in climate, how it’s changing, and how mosquitoes are responding to these changes by becoming an invasive species and expanding into new habitats. We developed an app where people can work as citizen scientists to identify breeding sites for mosquitoes potentially carrying the Zika virus, and become agents of change reducing the risk of Zika and other vector-borne diseases in their communities. They can report their findings, including habitat data, which end up on a shared map in the cloud,” says Low, a climate scientist at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES).