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Alaska National Guard : A foreign, radioactive satellite falls to earth, smashing through the airspace above Valdez, Alaska. Toxic Chemicals release from the satellite debris while compromised networks lead to cyber-attacks and panic ensues throughout the local communities.

The scenario above is fictional. But what if it actually happened? Who would respond? What capabilities does the military have to combat it?

These questions were explored and unmasked by National Guard units from 10 different states and multiple state and federal agencies during Arctic Eagle 2018, which consisted of scenario-based events at multiple locations throughout Alaska. The scenarios included hazardous material detection and response, security and protection of critical infrastructure, triage, domain awareness patrol, communication and transportation support.

The exercise was managed by the Alaska National Guard in order to test and validate arctic capabilities and practice emergency response in support of civil authorities.

The operation launched here Feb. 20 as Guard unit leadership and other agencies involved in Homeland Security began the command post exercise. The CPX aimed at ensuring the pace of the exercise would fully engage all participants and capitalize on gathering personnel to address known knowledge gaps on discrete topics like chemical and radiological decontamination or cyber defense vulnerabilities.

The CPX also established a joint task force, responsible for command and control and the exercise battle rhythm, a warfare concept at the heart of military operational management that efficiently processes input and intent to enable the commander to make decisive choices in controlling each moving piece of the exercise. Read more

Read also: NATO Deputy Secretary General discusses transatlantic partnership at Brussels Forum

 Alaska National Guard : A foreign, radioactive satellite falls to earth, smashing through the airspace above Valdez, Alaska. Toxic Chemicals release from the satellite debris while compromised networks lead to cyber-attacks and panic ensues throughout the local communities. 

The scenario above is fictional. But what if it actually happened? Who would respond? What capabilities does the military have to combat it?